Spring 2017: Garlic, eggplants, raspberries and grapes in the garden plot

It seemed like winter would never end — especially when we got snow in May — but the warm weather is finally here. And you know what that means: gardening!

This is my second year with the same garden plot, so I’m off to a good start already. I created rows in the fall and amended the soil by adding compost, leftover straw, and dead weeds (without the seeds). I left it like that all winter and biked over when the snow melted this spring. Instead of finding a plot that looks more like a neglected backyard than a garden (like last year), I found beautiful rows just waiting to be planted with seeds.

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Okay, so they may not look beautiful in this photo, but I’m proud of them! This setup makes my life so much easier.

The end row has garlic plants. Those came up first.

1-IMG_20170609_170058_hdrOf the eight or so garlic cloves that I’d planted, only two of them came up. I think that I might have covered them with too much straw, or maybe I buried them too deep. Anyway, it looks like I’ll get at least a couple of bulbs this year. I’m especially excited to try the garlic scapes when those grow! I have a recipe for garlic scapes pesto that looks really good.

The grape plant survived the winter. I have two photos: one from May and one from June.

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I’m happy with how fast it’s growing. Hopefully, I’ll get some grapes from it this year.

Next, I bought a few plants from the store. I’ve wanted a raspberry bush for a long time now, so I got one of those. I also bought a tray of about six eggplant seedlings. I went for a larger variety this year because last year’s eggplants were too small for my liking.

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I planted the eggplant seedlings in one of the rows. I spaced them farther apart than I did last year and kept them on the side of the plot that doesn’t flood (last year they almost died from flooding).

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So far, I’ve managed to not kill them.

The raspberry bush is also doing well.

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This bush (Coho) ripens late and produces high yields of raspberries that are supposed to taste delicious. From what I’ve read, raspberry bushes don’t produce fruit until a year after planting. However, I’m crossing my fingers that the internet is wrong and that my plant will grow at least a few berries this summer.

And, because I always need to have at least one unusual (to me) plant, I got an artichoke plant.

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So far, the plant is acclimating to the outdoor weather. It’s hard to tell from the photo, but the newer leaves are coming in more thick and sturdy than the older leaves. That’s what I love about gardening: watching the plants adapt to the crazy-hot weather and severe rainstorms.

So that’s what’s growing on half of my garden plot. The other half of the plot is overgrown with grass, weeds, and chives.

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Yeah. I have my work cut out for me! I bought some grass shears and cut down the worst of it. I left the chives alone, of course.

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The stupid shears broke approximately 5 minutes after I started using them. Serves me right for going with the cheap brand. Anyway, I’ll probably cover half the plot with weed barrier until I figure out what to do next. Right now I’m thinking of planting some cucumber seeds and butternut squash seeds. I also need to get more straw.

How’s your garden coming along? How do you deal with overgrown grass and weeds? Thanks for stopping by!

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